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Hoover DYC 8913B

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  • Hoover DYC 8913B

    Some would say I should just junk this machine, but the ongoing repairs haven't been costing much. So I persevere...

    Hopefully the wisdom on here will know what's going on this time.


    A few months ago (after advice given on here, thanks) I replaced the motor condensor on the above machine. That stalling motor problem disappeared and it's been running fine since.

    A week or so ago, during a period of heavy use (3 or 4 dry cycles one after the other) I heard mid-pitched, loud enough, constant 'growl' from the machine in the middle of a cycle. The sound is something like you'd get if a bearing seized and it's inner ring was forced to turn on a shaft. The drum continued to run as ever: smooth and at normal speed.

    I stopped the machine, started it again straightaway and the sound was gone. It ran for another 20 mins, switching rotation direction as usual ... then the noise back. Stopped it and started it again, noise back after 5 mins. We left it.

    It been used every day since but probably only for one cycle. The noise came back once in that time.

    I'm wondering if, during the period when the motor was stalling, whether the motor was damaged?


    Any other ideas?






  • #2
    Oops capacitor ... not condensor!

    Comment


    • #3
      Pulley tensioners on the motor common fault on Hoover dryers noisy in 1 direction and ok in the other

      Comment


      • #4
        Okay. Thanks for the direction. I'll keep and eye out and see whether I can ascertain a directional aspect to the noise. Safe to say that it's more likely to get worse than better!

        Comment


        • #5
          The battle with my Hoover dryer goes on. It's 5 years old at this stage but I'm going to wrestle with it until the very end.

          This time it's the heating which is gone. Dryer functioning normally but no heat.

          Question: the heating relay on the board has a cream colour casing. Here and there on the casing you can see tan discolouration. Would this be expected on a 5 year old relay or could it be a sign of the relay being blown. The relays are only a 10-er so I'd give a replacement a crack.

          Thanks

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          • #6
            2nd question!

            There are two 220V carrying plugs on the board: power supply in and (presumably) power out to the heating element. The heating element plug has one red and 3 black cables on it. The dryer is built in to a degree and I've the top off. I want to put 220V on the element to check if it's working without having to remove the machine.

            Is red common live and each of the blacks an element?

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            • #7
              Sorry for the fit's and start's approach but..

              I've used a tester I've got which glows red when there's voltage on the line. When the machine is running, I'm getting a glow from both the red and all the blacks.

              Normally you wouldn't get a glow from the neutral on a 220V circuit, just the live.

              Any ideas?

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              • #8
                Not sure this tester is any use. When the cycle ends the above wires still glow red. I notice too, some lighter gauge wires from another plug on the board (3 black, a yellow and a white) which I'm presuming is the motor supply (the heavier gauge ones referred to above doing the heating). They glow at end of cycle too.

                Time to buy a multimeter methinks.

                Comment


                • #9
                  correct time to buy a multimeter.

                  if you had applied power to the element
                  1 its not a safe thing to do
                  2 you run the risk without the fan running of blowing the overheat stat which mean new element on hoover

                  Dave

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by electrofix View Post
                    correct time to buy a multimeter.

                    if you had applied power to the element
                    1 its not a safe thing to do
                    2 you run the risk without the fan running of blowing the overheat stat which mean new element on hoover

                    Dave
                    I'd have done it whilst running the machine!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Righto. Got myself a (24 euro - I'm determined to beat this Hoover but only at a price) multimeter.


                      - When running, I've got 12V dc on the pair of pins at one end of the heating relay

                      - When running, I've got 220V between each pair of pins at the other end of the heating relay



                      Testing continuity with all powered down:


                      - the main neutral supply to the PCB links to one of the pairs of output pins on the heating relay (N pins lets say)

                      - the main live supply to the PCB connects to the other pair of output pins on the heating relay AND all 8 pins of a plug socket mounted nearby on the PCB


                      This plug going into this socket has 4 cables coming from it: 3 black and 1 red. (The sockets 8 pins are presumably paired - 2 for each cable - such as to provide firm mounting of the socket to the board). The 4 cables are the heaviest on the board and presumably carry the heating element current.


                      Sense check time:


                      1. I'm assuming the element is bunched. This, because I presume any safety's/overtemps would input into the board the the "brains" of the board would withhold 12V from the heating relay

                      2. But: I don't understand the circuitry. The heating relay when 12V is applied, appears to connect main board supply live (always connected to one set of relay pins) to main board supply neutral (always connected to the other set of relay pins)

                      Any illumination appreciated...








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                      • #12
                        if the relay has 12vdc at one end and 240v at the other its not working

                        when the relay closes it connects the main connections together so if you are measuring across the relay it would be no volts when energised 240v when not

                        the safety stats on the element work on 240v so if the relay goes short circuit it still can stop overheat

                        Dave

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by electrofix View Post
                          if the relay has 12vdc at one end and 240v at the other its not working

                          when the relay closes it connects the main connections together so if you are measuring across the relay it would be no volts when energised 240v when not

                          the safety stats on the element work on 240v so if the relay goes short circuit it still can stop overheat

                          Dave

                          Thanks very much Dave. That makes sense. It is indeed 240V across the relay whether energised or not. A 10 quid repair (assuming all else alright). A result!

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